EXHIBIT I

Trish Coonrod, Martha Fieber, Steve Immerman, and David Kapszukiewicz
Artist Reception: Saturday, May 27th, 4-7 pm

Artist Demo: - Trish Coonrod, Sunday, May 28th, 11-2pm

Exhibit runs May 26th - July 3rd

 
"Nectarines, cherries, Raspberries and Blueberries" - 12"x18"

"Nectarines, cherries, Raspberries and Blueberries" - 12"x18"

Classically-trained oil painter Patricia Coonrad focuses on still life for her subject matter, namely fruit with other objects to bring additional color and shape to her compositions. “I like painting fruit because it is a colorful, natural form, and each piece of fruit is unique and can imply gesture and personality,” she says. “Fruit is slowly but surely decomposing, making each painting a race against time in which I’m attempting to make a lasting record of something temporary.” Greatly influenced by a residency at the Cite Internationale Des Arts in Paris, where she studied directly from the paintings of the Old Masters, Coonrad combines traditional painting with the representational work she was exposed to as a lead painter for the studio of American contemporary artist Jeff Koons.

One of Fine Line’s longest-tenured exhibitors, fiber artist Martha Fieber uses layer upon layer of hand-stitching, subtle color, and plenty of details to create her complex compositions, which she calls “Landscapes in Thread.” These landscapes “express our connection to the natural world and encourage the viewer to contemplate the ongoing interconnectedness of all things,” she says. Working with single strands of silk, rayon, metallic, and hand-dyed cotton threads—and only four types of stitches—Fieber’s goal is to achieve an incredible amount of depth and perspective in her work, which echoes her feelings that there are “several layers to everything we see in the world.”

"Yellow Birches" - 11"x11"

"Yellow Birches" - 11"x11"

"The Blues" - 4"x19"x14"

"The Blues" - 4"x19"x14"

Steve Immerman has been working in glass for nearly forty years—the last 23 of those exclusively in kilnformed glass. He says he uses the art form as a respite from his “left-brained” career—one as a general surgeon and surgical oncologist. Immerman says there are many parallels between glass art and surgery. “They each require technical skill, precise planning, intense knowledge of what’s expected to happen, and neither allow for much margin of error. A common theme in Immerman’s work is geometric shapes and patterning—juxtaposing wild, chaotic design elements with serene backgrounds and geometric regularity.

Nature is the primary inspiration of oil, graphite, and acrylic artist David Kapszukiewicz—and his primary purpose it to share what he sees and feels with you, the viewer. Kapszukiewicz worked in graphic design for over thirty years, dabbling in fine art throughout his career before devoting most of his time to his craft—oil painting—just over a decade ago. After being accepted at the Kewaunee Academy of Fine Art, Kapszukiewicz now works full-time in his Tomahawk, Wisconsin studio or en plein air—creating striking paintings of familiar Northern Wisconsin landscapes reminiscent of the American Impressionists and sunlit portraits in natural settings.

 
"Adrift" - 18"x24"

"Adrift" - 18"x24"


EXHIBIT II

Pamela Murphy, Deanna Clayton and Nathan Bennett
Artist Reception: Thursday, July 6th, 4-7 pm

Artist Demo: - Trish Coonrod, Sunday, May 28th, 11-2pm

Exhibit runs July 6th - August 7th

Door County artist Pamela Murphy’s work has long been focused on the artist’s collection of old photographs, whose figures she chooses as the basis for her paintings. “The people whose lives are recorded in those pictures are strangers to us—yet at the same time, there’s a familiarity,” she says. “They remind us of ourselves, our families, and our issues—on levels that are both personal and cultural.” Murphy presents her figures on rich and textured surface, with many layers of paint to reveal the history of the canvas and isolate the form of each figure. “The viewer can then bring their own specific history to the painting, so a single image can mean different things to different people,” she says. “The goal is for the viewer to find a little of themselves in the work.”

"Wash Tub" - 30"x25"

"Wash Tub" - 30"x25"

"Untitled" - 11"x11"

"Untitled" - 11"x11"

Glass artist Deanna Clayton was introduced to glass right out of high school, and says the excitement of creating in the moment and handling the material in such an intimate way drew her in for life. For over 20 years, she specialized in pate de verre vessels—literally meaning “paste of glass”—in which glass granules are mixed with a binder and applied to the inner surface of a negative mold and finished with electroplated copper. For the past several years, her work has taken a slightly different turn, with Deanna modeling clay into human form and translating it to glass, harnessing the ability to show life with the material. Soft, flowing edges at the base of the sculptures add to the sense of impermanence.

Patina is metal artist Nathan Bennett’s medium of choice—a centuries-old process that has been handed down from one generation of artists to the next. Using silicon bronze plate, Bennett applies iron, silver, copper, and other chemical compound to achieve rich color before the fire infuses the chemicals onto the bronze. Having spent 20 years developing and controlling his process, Bennett says he seeks to create images that capture his inner workings through the subjects of trees, moonlight, and solitary pathways. “I paint with the intent of saying something,” Bennett says. “My work represents the intersection where a viewer can hear what I think, know what I say, and feel what I feel.”

"Lovely Stroll" - 18"x15"

"Lovely Stroll" - 18"x15"


EXHIBIT III

Nan Helscher,  Todd Voss, Dave Turner and Donna Brown
Artist Reception: Thursday, August 10th, 4-7 pm

Artist Demo: - Friday, August 11th, 11-2pm

Exhibit runs August 10th - September 8th

"Standing Rock" - 16"x16"

"Standing Rock" - 16"x16"

Oil and cold wax artist Nan Helscher says she likes to sculpt her paintings—using a variety of palette knives, steel wool, and fine paper to produce the desired effect. This allows her to build the painting up, using layer after layer to color—and to also manipulate the work by removing layers completely or building onto an existing one. Helscher loves to be surrounded by woods and nature, and finds that the place she’s called home for the past 12 years—Door County—provides the perfect backdrop to draw from artistically, and she feels fortunate to indulge in its beauty.

Oil painter Todd Voss became interested in the intersection of art and nature while growing up in Davenport, IA. His painting process begins with outdoor observations and the study of nature, often “taking notes” with his camera before escaping to his converted barn studio overlooking Lake Superior. There, he uses the photos—along with healthy doses of memory and instinct—to guide his direct method of painting.

"Ripe Fields" - 24"x32"

"Ripe Fields" - 24"x32"

"Heron" - 4"x6"

"Heron" - 4"x6"

Although woodworking had been part of Dave Turner’s life for some time, it wasn’t until he was in his mid-50s that he discovered woodturning—and shortly after that, wood dyeing. These discoveries have led to a special technique Turner uses, working with alcohol-based dyes and inks to display color on his boxelder or maple pieces in a variety of styles, whether it’s applying dye directly to the wood or applying it over a sealer. Turner’s work ranges from abstract to impressionism to realism, and he is constantly looking to evolve his work to see what the medium will allow him to do. “People are often surprised that my pieces are wood,” Turner says, “They often look like ceramic or porcelain, which is a testament to the range of the medium.”

When you ask Donna Brown why she creates art, she has a ready answer. “It’s about the process of looking for and seeing the details,” she says. “It’s about taking about and putting together—about making sense of the world I live in.” Always experimenting with processes—and the mediums of watercolors, etchings, or encaustics—Brown divides her time between the Mexico and the United States—specifically Door County—and finds that the beauty and boundlessness of nature in both locales make their way into her imagery and artwork, especially seeing her summer birds in their winter vacation spots in the South.

 
"Impressions" - 20"x28"

"Impressions" - 20"x28"

TOWNLINE ART FAIR

Saturday, October 7 th & Sunday, October 8 th  - Saturday 10-5, Sunday 10-4
A juried art fair exhibiting the work of more than 75 professional artists from across the Midwest exhibit during the two-day show held rain or shine. Glass, pottery, metal sculpture, paintings, photography, fiber art, and woodworking will be under tents for the 5,000 people that annually attend the show.

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